Preparing for Severe Weather: 4 Tips for Schools

A school's first priority is always the safety of its students and staff. Because of the often chaotic and crowded public setting, ensuring safety during severe weather can be a challenge. That’s why it’s crucial for schools, colleges, and universities of all sizes to prepare properly for severe weather ahead of time. Severe weather comes in many forms: thunder and lightning storms, hail, blizzards, tornadoes, hurricanes, and even earthquakes. The risk to your school from severe weather incidents depends on the geography and climate of your area. Therefore, severe weather response plans must be made with local conditions in mind. Here are 4 tips for preparing your institution for severe weather:  1.  Ensure a process for clear communicationCommunication in emergency situations is key. If communication breaks down or the processes aren’t set up for success, the whole organization could be more at risk. This concern is especially applicable to large schools with a more intricate patchwork of administration. Simple ways to ensure there will be clear communication during severe weather events include: Providing information and instructions to staff and students during severe weather concerns will help to avoid panic and keep everyone safe.  2.  Make sure you have access to accurate, up to date weather dataTime is of the essence in an emergency weather situation. Staying abreast of the latest weather developments as they come in is a necessary part of planning appropriate responses. That’s why it’s crucial for all schools to be equipped with trusted weather tracking and emergency weather alert software. Perry Weather’s cloud-based software suite equips users with an arsenal of real-time weather information and lightning alerts from any web-enabled device. Accessible from anywhere, Pocket Perry’s web and mobile solution instantly connects users to real-time lightning strike warnings and weather radar data directly in the palm of their hand. This makes it easy to track weather risks in real time, and make more informed decisions.  3.  Designate safety zonesSafety Zones are areas designated as the safest areas in a building during extreme weather. The best areas to gather during severe weather are generally areas that are as low as possible to the ground (underground is ideal), away from windows, and free of any debris that could become dangerous during intense winds or flooding. Ensure that your institution has set safety zones, as well as guidelines for when they should be used.  4.  Create a tiered planSome extreme weather situations are more severe than others. To help address each level of weather risk appropriately, you can develop a tier system with different levels of response. Color-coding them can help everyone on your team and your students better understand them. The lowest tier, for example, could mean simply taking extra precaution for outdoor activities like sporting events. The highest tier would mean the most intense response, such as lockdown to the safety zones. While you can’t predict the weather, you can be prepared to face severe weather. By taking the steps to prepare ahead of time, your school can be equipped to make quicker, more informed decisions to ensure the safety of the students, staff, and community. For real time emergency weather tracking and alerts, sign up for a free trial of Pocket Perry and see how it can help you and your institution prepare for severe weather!


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Preparing for Severe Weather: 4 Tips for Schools

A school's first priority is always the safety of its students and staff. Because of the often chaotic and crowded public setting, ensuring safety during severe weather can be a challenge. That’s why it’s crucial for schools, colleges, and universities of all sizes to prepare properly for severe weather ahead of time. Severe weather comes in many forms: thunder and lightning storms, hail, blizzards, tornadoes, hurricanes, and even earthquakes. The risk to your school from severe weather incidents depends on the geography and climate of your area. Therefore, severe weather response plans must be made with local conditions in mind. Here are 4 tips for preparing your institution for severe weather:  1.  Ensure a process for clear communicationCommunication in emergency situations is key. If communication breaks down or the processes aren’t set up for success, the whole organization could be more at risk. This concern is especially applicable to large schools with a more intricate patchwork of administration. Simple ways to ensure there will be clear communication during severe weather events include: Providing information and instructions to staff and students during severe weather concerns will help to avoid panic and keep everyone safe.  2.  Make sure you have access to accurate, up to date weather dataTime is of the essence in an emergency weather situation. Staying abreast of the latest weather developments as they come in is a necessary part of planning appropriate responses. That’s why it’s crucial for all schools to be equipped with trusted weather tracking and emergency weather alert software. Perry Weather’s cloud-based software suite equips users with an arsenal of real-time weather information and lightning alerts from any web-enabled device. Accessible from anywhere, Pocket Perry’s web and mobile solution instantly connects users to real-time lightning strike warnings and weather radar data directly in the palm of their hand. This makes it easy to track weather risks in real time, and make more informed decisions.  3.  Designate safety zonesSafety Zones are areas designated as the safest areas in a building during extreme weather. The best areas to gather during severe weather are generally areas that are as low as possible to the ground (underground is ideal), away from windows, and free of any debris that could become dangerous during intense winds or flooding. Ensure that your institution has set safety zones, as well as guidelines for when they should be used.  4.  Create a tiered planSome extreme weather situations are more severe than others. To help address each level of weather risk appropriately, you can develop a tier system with different levels of response. Color-coding them can help everyone on your team and your students better understand them. The lowest tier, for example, could mean simply taking extra precaution for outdoor activities like sporting events. The highest tier would mean the most intense response, such as lockdown to the safety zones. While you can’t predict the weather, you can be prepared to face severe weather. By taking the steps to prepare ahead of time, your school can be equipped to make quicker, more informed decisions to ensure the safety of the students, staff, and community. For real time emergency weather tracking and alerts, sign up for a free trial of Pocket Perry and see how it can help you and your institution prepare for severe weather!

Preparing for Severe Weather: 4 Tips for Schools

A school's first priority is always the safety of its students and staff. Because of the often chaotic and crowded public setting, ensuring safety during severe weather can be a challenge. That’s why it’s crucial for schools, colleges, and universities of all sizes to prepare properly for severe weather ahead of time. Severe weather comes in many forms: thunder and lightning storms, hail, blizzards, tornadoes, hurricanes, and even earthquakes. The risk to your school from severe weather incidents depends on the geography and climate of your area. Therefore, severe weather response plans must be made with local conditions in mind. Here are 4 tips for preparing your institution for severe weather:  1.  Ensure a process for clear communicationCommunication in emergency situations is key. If communication breaks down or the processes aren’t set up for success, the whole organization could be more at risk. This concern is especially applicable to large schools with a more intricate patchwork of administration. Simple ways to ensure there will be clear communication during severe weather events include: Providing information and instructions to staff and students during severe weather concerns will help to avoid panic and keep everyone safe.  2.  Make sure you have access to accurate, up to date weather dataTime is of the essence in an emergency weather situation. Staying abreast of the latest weather developments as they come in is a necessary part of planning appropriate responses. That’s why it’s crucial for all schools to be equipped with trusted weather tracking and emergency weather alert software. Perry Weather’s cloud-based software suite equips users with an arsenal of real-time weather information and lightning alerts from any web-enabled device. Accessible from anywhere, Pocket Perry’s web and mobile solution instantly connects users to real-time lightning strike warnings and weather radar data directly in the palm of their hand. This makes it easy to track weather risks in real time, and make more informed decisions.  3.  Designate safety zonesSafety Zones are areas designated as the safest areas in a building during extreme weather. The best areas to gather during severe weather are generally areas that are as low as possible to the ground (underground is ideal), away from windows, and free of any debris that could become dangerous during intense winds or flooding. Ensure that your institution has set safety zones, as well as guidelines for when they should be used.  4.  Create a tiered planSome extreme weather situations are more severe than others. To help address each level of weather risk appropriately, you can develop a tier system with different levels of response. Color-coding them can help everyone on your team and your students better understand them. The lowest tier, for example, could mean simply taking extra precaution for outdoor activities like sporting events. The highest tier would mean the most intense response, such as lockdown to the safety zones. While you can’t predict the weather, you can be prepared to face severe weather. By taking the steps to prepare ahead of time, your school can be equipped to make quicker, more informed decisions to ensure the safety of the students, staff, and community. For real time emergency weather tracking and alerts, sign up for a free trial of Pocket Perry and see how it can help you and your institution prepare for severe weather!